• Dan Wright

    Decent and nippy launch coaster for families, but no effects working at all in comparison to its Ohio twin.

  • Dan Wright

    The most over-engineered ride station of any kiddie coaster on the planet.

  • Dan Wright

    By no means awful as far as the concept of stand-up coasters go. Relatively smooth and intense.

  • Dan Wright

    First Drop Capacity Pace

    The fact that Skyrush's lift hill puts some launch coasters to shame says it all really. This ride is an utter balls-to-the-wall sprint from start to finish; threatening any guest sat in the back row left seat with an ejection across into the next state. A consistent, ludicrous adrenaline rush that only gets better each time you ride it.

  • Dan Wright

    Pointless Layout

    The dullest coaster to ever roll off the B&M production line.

  • Dan Wright

    Layout

    By no means the worst Arrow concoction, but by no means the best either. Smoother than it looks, however the layout is somewhat on the less inspired side.

  • Dan Wright

    Inversions Smoothness Hangtime Rattle

    Steel Curtain is a bizarrely perfect cocktail of elements; all crafted together to form a monstrously, ugly towering structure across the skyline of Pittsburgh. The feeling of height that is conveyed when hung upside down through its first towering inversion is astounding, whilst the navigation of elements with its length of train seems almost unreal. Generally all an around exceptional roller coaster and a great home run from Kennywood.

  • Dan Wright

    Airtimes Ejectors Launch

    For all its problem during its first season, Lightning Rod is well worth the wait. A cocktail of beautiful hillside mixed with utterly relentless air time, particularly on the ludicrous hillside finale. Whilst the launch itself is lacking any significant grunt, the remainder of the ride that hides over the crest of the first hill is downright bonkers and a thorough joy right to the last moment.

  • Dan Wright

    Theming Too short Disappointing!

    The story and the theming are the saving grace for what is a mediocre but smooth layout.

  • Dan Wright

    First Drop Pace Duration

    Valkyria is a refreshing take on the mini-dive coaster concept. A combination of a lengthened layout and consistent, surprisingly quick pacing leave it leagues ahead from the likes of Baron and Krake. The new B&M vest restraints without the tightening component that plague older B&M vest coasters mean freedom for riders on the first drop as well as buckets of hang time in the final roll over the river. Valkyria may not be Liseberg's best roller coaster; heck even the second best, but it's a significant mark on the future of mini dive coasters as well as the best thing to ever happen to the wretched Fairy Tale Castle that once stood in Valkyria's layout.

  • Dan Wright

    First Drop Hangtime Dead spots

    For the most part, Wildfire is a breathtaking ride experience. It could stop at the top of the lift hill for 40 minutes before an evacuation and still be an unrivalled experience; the views from atop are easily amongst some of the most picturesque from any roller coaster in the world. The plunge down the cliff side is outrageously run, as is the hang time hill following it. A perfect blend of height mixed with close call terrain rushes give Wildfire its unmistakable identity. Despite this however, not all is perfect. The 3/4 mark on the layout signals the end of its bite, as the train seemingly limps with lack of ambition back to the station giving riders time to collect their breath. In reality, a balls to the wall finish dash to the brake run would have been the icing on the cake for Wildfire.

  • Dan Wright

    Airtimes Comfort Masterpiece Rattle

    Helix is the pinnacle of roller coaster design, encompassing everything that a great coaster should be. A varied range of inversions mixed with some fun launches, combined with the great Mack restraints and a superb soundtrack. Riding last thing at night is a crowning jewel moment of any enthusiast's coaster trips with the twinkling lights of Liseberg and Gothenburg providing a picturesque backdrop. Helix is one-of-a-kind,a coaster built by enthusiasts for enthusiasts.

  • Dan Wright

    Airtimes Dead spots

    Shambhala should be really good. Should. Plagued by PA's's miserable operations and overhyped as a tremendous airtime machine, Shambhala leaves something to be desired. Whilst there are some pops of airtime throughout the layout, they're somewhat underwhelming when ranked against over coasters of the same calibre.

  • Dan Wright

    First Drop Rattle Pointless

    Hyperion has been one of the biggest draws for enthusiasts to visit Poland; a relatively new park in the form of Energylandia investing millions into this seemingly awesome Intamin giant. The theming is a huge step out from Energylandia's cheap and tacky previous efforts, whilst is also the first step the park are making at investing into huge, uniquely crafted experiences as opposed to off the shelf / straight from the manufacturer catalogue tat. Hyperion's first drop is an awesome opener, even more so with a loose restraint; an intense ecstasy powered rush that could never grow boring. That one song that no matter how many times you listen to it, still gives you goosebumps regardless of how long it’s been stuck on repeat. Yet what follows is an irritable rattle that companies you around the rest of the layout, with only one major air time hill to give the ride any outstanding zest. The real sting with Hyperion however is the finale; a totally unnecessary water splash which may appear to be impressive from off-ride, but is significantly discomforting on-ride particularly on the back row. This isn't just a moderate spray either; rather a painful soaking that will see to outclassing the park's actual water rides. Once the ride warms up, the water splash ending is unable to catch you as the train now runs fast enough to miss it entirely. The air time from the first hill grows increasingly wonderful as Hyperion charges on throughout the day, whilst the first drop continues to hold its weight as a superb opener. Hyperion is best experienced at the end of the day with low expectations of what coasters of this calibre can do. Whilst it is a good all round ride, the unmissable rattles and the ridiculous water splash finale detract from what should have been the perfect coaster for a park that is finally seeing sense and shifting towards deeper and more intricate theme park experience.

  • Dan Wright

    Inversions Masterpiece Smoothness

    Lech coaster is a firm statement from Vekoma that their newer manufacturing techniques can land knock out blows on rival manufacturers. At the cost of what some parks would use to deploy an extensive flat ride or small scale dark ride, Legendia have worked with Vekoma to produce an incredible value for money Bermuda Blitz model. A turning point for the park in terms of theming, Lech is not only the headlining ride of the park, but also makes swift work of trumping the much newer Hyperion at nearby Energylandia. It’s the pinnacle statement from Vekoma that their new track and trains are leagues ahead of their previous efforts. Lech makes all B&M wing coasters feel like cheap, Pinfari rattle traps. The entire ride is smoother than silk, traversing its layout like an ice skater gliding across black ice with a degree of courage, ferocity but also a dash of grace as well. It pulls you down its first drop with a great deal of airtime, especially towards the back, before blitzing straight into the sidewinder. Lech ventures into i305 territory for its intense exit to the sidewinder, inducing varying levels of grey outs. Yet following straight on from this, an elegant turn over the lake before pulling through a roll directly over the station roof. The transition is so smooth you simply can’t feel it occurring, almost as if being inverted by magic. The following sections right up to the on-ride photo are carried out addictive speed and demonstrates no signs of stopping, effortlessly tumbling you through the final corkscrew with a delightful decorum. Even after this, Lech still refuses to lose any steam, traversing an outward banked dive and a series of sweeping turns back to the brake run. Even the ending is done with such smoothness that it’s difficult to comprehend it just happened. Lech is everything a great roller coaster should be. The pacing is consistent and continuous, keeping you hooked high on its ecstasy as it shows you what Vekoma’s modern engineering is capable of. An airtime machine combined with inversions that have been seemingly crafted by mythical gods of the roller coaster world, all whilst doing so in a quiet and humble manner. It doesn’t look intimidating, nor does it look timid. Lech strikes the finest palette taste for roller coasters; a catalyst for some of the best things you could ask for on a coaster. The trains are comfortable and well built. Whilst there is room for improvement in perhaps the unnecessary need for the vests, they’re hardly offensive when compared to those of B&M’s wing coasters, and the theming shows that Legendia have the ability to leave their fairground heritage in the past and continue to craft well designed experiences.